Russian capsule carrying robot fails space station docking

In this photo taken on Friday, July 26, 2019, and distributed by Roscosmos Space Agency Press Service, the Fedor robot is displayed before being loaded into a Soyuz capsule that was launched Thursday Aug. 22, 2019, from the launch pad at Russia's space facility in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. A Russian space capsule carrying a humanoid robot has failed to dock as planned with the International Space Station. A statement from the Russian space agency Roscosmos said the failure to dock on Saturday Aug. 24, 2019, was because of problems in the docking system, but didn't give details. (Roscosmos Space Agency Press Service photo via AP)

A Russian space capsule carrying a humanoid robot has failed to dock as planned with the International Space Station

MOSCOW — A Russian space capsule carrying a humanoid robot has failed to dock as planned with the International Space Station.

A statement from the Russian space agency Roscosmos said the failure on Saturday was because of problems in the docking system. It said the space station itself and the six-person crew are safe.

Roscosmos head Dmitry Rogozin said on Twitter that a new docking attempt would be made on Tuesday.

The capsule was launched Thursday as part of tests of a new rocket that is expected to replace the Soyuz-FG next year.

It is carrying a robot called Fedor, which will perform two weeks of tests aboard the space station. Vladimir Solovyev, flight director for the Russian segment of the ISS, said the robot had not been taught how to manually conduct a docking.

Related News

UK promises to maintain EU funding for farming, science

Aug 13, 2016

The British government says it will keep paying for European Union-funded agriculture, infrastructure and science projects until 2020, even if Britain leaves the bloc before then

Director: New Mexico spaceport positioned for next frontier

Aug 13, 2016

New Mexico's Spaceport America has hosted nearly 30 vertical rocket launches and its futurist hangar and runway are ready for tourists as all the infrastructure is in place for the next step in the commercial space race

US agency studies how to detect algae bloom outbreaks

Aug 13, 2016

U.S. Geological Survey scientists spent this week studying how nutrient levels contribute to algae bloom outbreaks at two major Utah lakes

About Us

Stillsurge is a home for individuals to find the latest day-to-day Science and Technology news which electrify and empower their knowledge.