NASA replaces astronaut on Boeing's 1st crew launch

FILE - In this Tuesday, March 29, 2011 file photo, space shuttle Endeavour crew member Mike Fincke waves to onlookers after arriving for a practice countdown at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. On Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2019, astronaut Eric Boe was pulled from the upcoming test flight for unspecified medical reasons, after more than three years of training. Taking his seat will be Fincke, a former space station commander. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)

NASA replaces astronaut assigned to Boeing's first capsule launch with a crew

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — NASA has replaced an astronaut assigned to Boeing's first launch with a crew.

Astronaut Eric Boe was pulled Tuesday from the upcoming test flight for unspecified medical reasons, after more than three years of training. Taking his seat will be Mike Fincke, a former space station commander.

Boeing plans to launch its first Starliner capsule without a crew this spring, followed by a launch with astronauts this summer to the International Space Station.

SpaceX — NASA's other commercial crew partner — could launch its Dragon capsule, minus a crew, next month. The capsule and Falcon rocket were on the launch pad Wednesday for a test engine firing.

Boe and three other NASA astronauts were chosen in 2015 as the first commercial crew members. They were assigned to either an initial Dragon or Starliner mission last year.

Boeing astronaut Chris Ferguson, who commanded the final space shuttle flight in 2011 before leaving NASA, said it would have been "an honor" to fly with Boe again to the space station. They were on the same shuttle flight in 2008 during station construction.

"The #Starliner team is bummed that he isn't making this trip," Ferguson said via Twitter, while noting Fincke "brings years of experience." Ferguson said he and NASA astronaut Nicole Mann, who's also on the first Starliner crew, are glad to have Fincke on board.

___

The Associated Press Health & Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Related News

UK promises to maintain EU funding for farming, science

Aug 13, 2016

The British government says it will keep paying for European Union-funded agriculture, infrastructure and science projects until 2020, even if Britain leaves the bloc before then

Director: New Mexico spaceport positioned for next frontier

Aug 13, 2016

New Mexico's Spaceport America has hosted nearly 30 vertical rocket launches and its futurist hangar and runway are ready for tourists as all the infrastructure is in place for the next step in the commercial space race

US agency studies how to detect algae bloom outbreaks

Aug 13, 2016

U.S. Geological Survey scientists spent this week studying how nutrient levels contribute to algae bloom outbreaks at two major Utah lakes

Broaden News

About Us

Stillsurge is a home for individuals to find the latest day-to-day Science and Technology news which electrify and empower their knowledge.

Contact us: sales@stillsurge.com