Manfred Eigen, 1967 Nobel chemistry laureate, dies at 91

BERLIN — Manfred Eigen, who shared the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1967 for his work on extremely fast chemical reactions, has died. He was 91.

The Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Goettingen, Germany, which Eigen founded in 1971, said that he died on Wednesday. Herbert Jaeckle, an emeritus director at the institute, said Thursday that "perhaps more than anybody else, Manfred Eigen understood how to think out of the box and successfully pursue new scientific directions."

Eigen was awarded half the 1967 chemistry Nobel, with the other half going jointly to R.G.W. Norrish and George Porter.

Eigen in 1953 introduced high-frequency sound waves as a way of bringing about rapid chemical reactions and processes, whose speed could be calculated based on the sound waves' energy.

Related News

UK promises to maintain EU funding for farming, science

Aug 13, 2016

The British government says it will keep paying for European Union-funded agriculture, infrastructure and science projects until 2020, even if Britain leaves the bloc before then

Director: New Mexico spaceport positioned for next frontier

Aug 13, 2016

New Mexico's Spaceport America has hosted nearly 30 vertical rocket launches and its futurist hangar and runway are ready for tourists as all the infrastructure is in place for the next step in the commercial space race

US agency studies how to detect algae bloom outbreaks

Aug 13, 2016

U.S. Geological Survey scientists spent this week studying how nutrient levels contribute to algae bloom outbreaks at two major Utah lakes

About Us

Stillsurge is a home for individuals to find the latest day-to-day Science and Technology news which electrify and empower their knowledge.