Detectives: 1994 technology slowed search for serial killer

In this undated photo provided by the Florida Department of Corrections, Gary Ray Bowles is shown. Bowles is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection at Florida State Prison on Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019, for the murder of Walter Hinton in Jacksonville Beach in November 1994. (Florida Department of Corrections via AP)

Detectives who investigated a string of 1994 slayings committed by serial killer Gary Ray Bowles say they probably could have stopped him sooner if they had had today's technology

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Detectives who investigated a string of 1994 slayings that Gary Ray Bowles confessed to committing say he probably would have been caught sooner if they had had today's technology.

Bowles is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection Thursday for the murder of Walter Hinton in Jacksonville Beach, Florida. Prosecutors say Hinton was Bowles' sixth and final known victim.

Investigators suspected Bowles almost immediately after the first of the killings: He left a parole document with his name on it in the victim's Daytona Beach home. He also was caught on an ATM camera trying to withdraw money from the victim's bank account.

But Bowles fled from city to city. Investigators say that with the technology they had in the '90s, it sometimes took days to get information that would lead them to him.

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